High density lipoprotein and coronary heart disease: Lessons from recent intervention trials

H. B. Rubins

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies have consistently implicated low plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol as an important, independent risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease. However, clinical trials specifically designed to evaluate the role of lipid therapy in patients with low high density lipoprotein cholesterol have only been recently reported. They include two trials with angiographic end points, the Lopid Coronary Angiograpby Trial and the Bezafibrate Coronary Atherosclerosis Intervention Trial, and three clinical end points trials, the Air Force/Texas Coronary Atherosclerosis Prevention study, the Department of Veterans Affairs High Density Lipoprotein Intervention Trial, and the Bezafibrate Infarction Prevention study. These and other trials clearly indicate that persons with coronary heart disease and high low density lipoprotein cholesterol (>130 mg/dL [3.36 mmol/L]), with or without low high density lipoprotein cholesterol, benefit from statin therapy. The Air Force/Texas Coronary Atherosclerosis Prevention study showed that persons at high risk of coronary heart disease but without known disease, who have moderate levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol as well as low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol, also appear to benefit from statin therapy although the cost effectiveness of this approach is unclear. The results from the Department of Veterans Affairs High Density Lipoprotein Intervention Trial provide convincing evidence that patients without high low density lipoprotein cholesterol and with established coronary heart disease and low high density lipoprotein cholesterol benefit from gemfibrozil. This drug may be particularly beneficial for patients who, in addition to low high density lipoprotein cholesterol, present with other features of the metabolic syndrome, such as obesity, glucose intolerance, and high triglycerides. Whether other fibrates, niacin, or statins lower coronary heart disease risk in persons with low high density lipoprotein cholesterol in the absence of high or moderately high low density lipoprotein cholesterol is unknown. (C) 2000 by CHF, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-39
Number of pages7
JournalPreventive cardiology
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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