High-frequency ultrasonic atomization for drug delivery to rodent animal models - Optimal particle size for lung inhalation of difluoromethyl ornithine

Guifang Zhang, Chris Fandrey, Amir Naqwi, Timothy Scott Wiedmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

A high-(8-MHz) and a low-(1.7-MHz) frequency ultrasonic transducer were compared for delivering aerosols to mouse lung. The aerosol concentration (mass of dry particles/volume of air) rose nonlinearly with solution concentration of difluoromethyl ornithine for both transducers. The particle size was linear with the cube root of the solution concentration, and the slope of the low-frequency transducer was 8 times greater than that of the high-frequency transducer. The deposition fraction assessed by the assayed mass in the lung relative to the calculated inhaled mass was found to decline exponentially with particle size. The lower-frequency transducer provided a higher dose despite a lower deposition fraction, but the high-frequency transducer was more efficient and provides a more selective deposition in the lower respiratory tract while operating with significantly less demands on aerosol drying.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-223
Number of pages15
JournalExperimental Lung Research
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Accepted 17 January 2007. Support was provided in part by NIH SBIR grant 1R43HL081789-01 (Program Official: Thomas Croxton) and NIH grant P01CA096964. Address correspondence to Timothy Scott Wiedmann, PhD, Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Minnesota, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. E-mail: wiedm001@umn.edu

Keywords

  • Aerosol delivery
  • Chemoprevention
  • DFMO
  • Output
  • Particle size distribution
  • Ultrasonic atomization

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