Hmong American sons and daughters: Exploring mechanisms of parent-child acculturation conflicts

Nazneen F. Bahrassa, Mary Joyce D. Juan, Rich Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined gender differences in parent-child acculturation conflicts among Hmong American college students (N = 120) and tested whether cultural attributions or perceived control explained the relationship between acculturation conflict and psychological distress. No significant differences by gender of the student were found in acculturation conflict with either parent. In addition, cultural attributions did not moderate the relationship between acculturation conflict and psychological distress. However, perceived control mediated the relationship between acculturation conflict and distress for mothers and sons. Specifically, greater conflict between sons and mothers was related to lower perceived control, which in turn was related to higher psychological distress. These findings highlight the importance of understanding cultural and gender dynamics in parent-child relationship in Hmong American families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-108
Number of pages9
JournalAsian American Journal of Psychology
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

Keywords

  • Hmong American
  • dissonant acculturation
  • gender differences
  • parent- child conflict
  • perceived control

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Hmong American sons and daughters: Exploring mechanisms of parent-child acculturation conflicts'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this