How national institutions influence technology policies and firms' knowledge-building strategies: A study of fuel cell innovation across industrialized countries

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Abstract

The central thesis advanced in this study is that firms' knowledge-building strategies can be usefully explained by the variations in their national institutional contexts. Using an inductive approach, a study of fuel cell innovation across the U.S., France, Japan and Norway demonstrates how countries' socio-political institutions - characterized by their levels of statism and corporatism - contribute to variations in technology policies pertaining to investment, collaboration, internationalization, and diversity. These technology policies are sources of advantages (and disadvantages) for firms, with implications for their knowledge-building strategies. The proposed theoretical framework is especially relevant in the context of industry emergence and R&D internationalization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1248-1259
Number of pages12
JournalResearch Policy
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009

Bibliographical note

Copyright:
Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Corporatism
  • Fuel cells
  • Knowledge-building
  • Statism
  • Technology policies

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