Hyperglycemia accentuates and ketonemia attenuates hypoglycemia-induced neuronal injury in the developing rat brain

Kathleen Ennis, Hannah Dotterman, Ariel Stein, Raghavendra Rao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background:Prolonged hypoglycemia leads to brain injury, despite treatment with 10% dextrose. Whether induction of hyperglycemia or ketonemia achieves better neuroprotection is unknown. Hyperglycemia is neuroprotective in other brain injuries during development; however, it worsens hypoglycemia-induced injury in the adult brain via poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) overactivation.Methods:Three-week-old rats were subjected to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and treated with 10% dextrose or 50% dextrose. Neuronal injury, PARP-1, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) III/TrkB/p75 NTR expressions were determined. In the second experiment, ketonemia was induced by administering β-hydroxybutyrate during hypoglycemia and its effect on neuronal injury was compared with those conventionally treated using 10% dextrose.Results:Both 10 and 50% dextrose administration led to hyperglycemia (50% dextrose > 10% dextrose). Compared with the 10% dextrose group, neuronal injury was greater in the 50% dextrose group and was accompanied by PARP-1 overactivation. BDNF III and p75 NTR, but not TrkB FL, mRNA expressions were upregulated. Neuronal injury was less severe in the rats subjected to ketonemia, compared with those conventionally treated using 10% dextrose.Conclusion:Hyperglycemia accentuated hypoglycemia-induced neuronal injury, likely via PARP-1 overactivation. Although BDNF was upregulated, it was not neuroprotective and potentially exaggerated injury by binding to p75 NTR receptor. Conversely, ketonemia during hypoglycemia attenuated neuronal injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)84-90
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Research
Volume77
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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