Identification of redox imbalance as a prominent metabolic response elicited by rapeseed feeding in swine metabolome

Chi Chen, M. Pérez de Nanclares, J. F. Kurtz, M. P. Trudeau, L. Wang, Dana Yao, Milena Saqui-Salces, Pedro E Urriola, L. T. Mydland, Gerald C Shurson, M. Overland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rapeseed (RS) is an abundant and inexpensive source of energy and AA in diets for monogastrics and a sustainable alternative to soybean meal. It also contains diverse bio-active phytochemicals that could have antinutri-tional effects at high dose. When the RS-derived feed ingredients (RSF) are used in swine diets, the uptake of these nutrients and phytochemicals is expected to affect the metabolic system. In this study, 2 groups of young pigs (17.8 ± 2.7 kg initial BW) were equally fed a soybean meal-based control diet and an RSF-based diet, respectively, for 3 wk. Digesta, liver, and serum samples from these pigs were examined by liquid chromatog-raphy–mass spectrometry–based metabolomic analysis to determine the metabolic effects of the 2 diets. Analyses of digesta samples revealed that sinapine, sinapic acid, and gluconapin were robust exposure markers of RS. The distribution of free AA along the intestine of RSF pigs was consistent with the reduced apparent ileal digestibility of AA observed in these pigs. Despite its higher fiber content, the RSF diet did not affect microbial metabolites in the digesta, including short-chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. Analyses of the liver and serum samples revealed that RSF altered the levels of AA metabolites involved in the urea cycle and 1-carbon metabolism. More importantly, RSF increased the levels of multiple oxidized metabolites and aldehydes while decreased the levels of ascorbic acid and docosahexaenoic acid–containing lipids in the liver and serum, suggesting that RSF could disrupt redox balance in young pigs. Overall, the results indicated that RSF elicited diverse metabolic events in young pigs through its influences on nutrient and antioxidant metabolism, which might affect the performance and health in long-term feeding and also provide the venues for nutritional and processing interventions to improve the utilization of RSF in pigs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1757-1768
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume96
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 4 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
1This study was financially supported by FeedMileage-Efficient use of Feed Resources for a Sustainable Norwegian Food Production (Research Council of Norway, Oslo, Norway; grant no. 233685/E50), and Foods of Norway, Centre for Research-based Innovation (Research Council of Norway; grant no. 237841/030). The research by C.C. is partially supported by a USDA Agricultural Experiment Station project MIN-18-092. 2Corresponding author: chichen@umn.edu Received August 6, 2017. Accepted March 2, 2018.

Funding Information:
This study was financially supported by FeedMileage-Efficient use of Feed Resources for a Sustainable Norwegian Food Production (Research Council of Norway, Oslo, Norway; grant no. 233685/E50), and Foods of Norway, Centre for Research-based Innovation (Research Council of Norway; grant no. 237841/030). The research by C.C. is partially supported by a USDA Agricultural Experiment Station project MIN-18-092.

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2018.

Keywords

  • Amino acid metabolism
  • Metabolomics
  • Rapeseed
  • Redox balance
  • Swine

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