Identifying needs and uses of digital Indigenous food knowledge and practices for an Indigenous Food Wisdom Repository

Michelle D. Johnson-Jennings, Derek R. Jennings, Koushik Paul, Meg M. Little

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Indigenous food sovereignty and security are essential to Indigenous health and cultural perpetuity. Revitalization of traditional foodways can counteract the negative impacts of colonial food practices and policies on the health of Indigenous peoples. A mixed methods survey was conducted to describe the data needs of people working in Indigenous nutrition related fields. Results showed that nutrition education, academic scholarship, and community projects were the most frequently used data categories. With improved access, projects-in-progress and raw data would be utilized for reference and staying current. The most common barrier was not knowing where or how to access information. Raw research data, research, projects-in-progress, and tribal policy were the most difficult to access. The study concludes that an online Food Wisdom Repository can contribute to health equity by improving access to Indigenous knowledge and wise practices, cultivating culturally appropriate data sharing, and sustaining and extending current work in the field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)290-299
Number of pages10
JournalAlterNative
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: The authors received funding from the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community through the Seeds of Native Health initiative.

Keywords

  • American Indian
  • Indigenous health
  • diabetes prevention
  • digital data
  • food sovereignty
  • nutrition education
  • obesity prevention

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