"If it shall seem just and proper": The effect of race and morals on alimony and child support appeals in the District of Columbia, 1950-1980

Sheila D. Ards, William A. Darity, Samuel L Myers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article tests the hypothesis that judicial arbitrariness dominated alimony or child support appeals in the pre-no-fault era by analyzing data on all alimony and child support appeals in the District of Columbia from 1950 through 1980. Censored regression analysis is used to isolate the impacts of race and morals grounds for divorce on changes in alimony and child support awards from trial to appeal. The results show large race effects but small morals effects. Judicial discretion - measured by unexplained gaps in awards - dominated relevant economic factors in determining changes in alimony and child support awards during the pre-no-fault era.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)441-475
Number of pages35
JournalJournal of Family History
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1998

Bibliographical note

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Copyright 2018 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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