Imaging Mechanisms of Disease Progression in Multiple Sclerosis: Beyond Brain Atrophy

NAIMS Cooperative

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Clinicians involved with different aspects of the care of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and scientists with expertise on clinical and imaging techniques convened in Dallas, TX, USA on February 27, 2019 at a North American Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis Cooperative workshop meeting. The aim of the workshop was to discuss cardinal pathobiological mechanisms implicated in the progression of MS and novel imaging techniques, beyond brain atrophy, to unravel these pathologies. Indeed, although brain volume assessment demonstrates changes linked to disease progression, identifying the biological mechanisms leading up to that volume loss are key for understanding disease mechanisms. To this end, the workshop focused on the application of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques to assess and measure disease progression in both the brain and the spinal cord. Clinical translation of quantitative MRI was recognized as of vital importance, although the need to maintain a relatively short acquisition time mandated by most radiology departments remains the major obstacle toward this effort. Regarding PET, the panel agreed upon its utility to identify ongoing pathological processes. However, due to costs, required expertise, and the use of ionizing radiation, PET was not considered to be a viable option for ongoing care of persons with MS. Collaborative efforts fostering robust study designs and imaging technique standardization across scanners and centers are needed to unravel disease mechanisms leading to progression and discovering medications halting neurodegeneration and/or promoting repair.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-266
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Neuroimaging
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Dr. Bagnato serves in the Editorial Board of Journal of Neuroimaging, served on advisory boards for?EMD Serono, acted as site PI for multi-center trial funded by Novartis, acts as site PI for a multi-center trial funded by EMD Serono, serves as consultant for Novartis. Dr. Bagnato receives funds from NIH:?RO1 NS109114-01; NMSS: PP-1801-29686 and RG 1807-31051; and Biogen Idec. Dr. Gauthier serves in the Editorial Board of Journal of Neuroimaging and served as a consultant for Celgene. Dr. Gauthier receives funds from NIH: RO1 NS104283, RO1 NS105144, and R01 NS090464. Dr. Laule serves in the Editorial Board of Journal of Neuroimaging. Dr. Laule receives funds from the MS Society of Canada and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Dr. Moore has received a grant-in-aid of research from Berlex Canada and a teaching honorarium from Teva, and served as a consultant to Schering. Dr. Moore receives funds from the MS Society of Canada: EGID 3248. Dr. Bove served as a consultant for EMD-Serono, Novartis, Roche Genentech, and Sanofi-Genzyme. Dr. Bove receives funds from NMSS CA TA 3062-A-3; California Institute to Advance Precision Medicine and Hilton Foundation Grant 16850. Dr. Cai has no conflicts to declare. Dr. Cai receives funds from NIH: K01 EB023312 and R01 AG058773. Dr. Cohen-Adad has no conflicts to declare. Dr. Cohen-Adad receives funds from the Canada Research Chair in Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging: 950?230815; the Canadian Institute of Health Research: CIHR FDN-143263; the Canada Foundation for Innovation (32454, 34824); the Fonds de Recherche du Qu?bec: Sant? 28826; the Fonds de Recherche du Qu?bec - Nature et Technologies: 2015-PR-182754; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada: RGPIN-2019-07244; Canada First Research Excellence Fund IVADO and TransMedTech; Quebec BioImaging Network: 5886, 35450. Dr. Harrison received consulting fees from EMD-Serono, Genzyme, Biogen, and Genentech. Dr. Harrison receives funds from NIH: 1K23NS072366-01A1 and?1R01NS104403-01, NMSS: PP-1804-30760, EMD Serono, and Roche Genentech. Dr. Klawiter receives consulting fees from Alexion, Biogen, EMD Serono, and Genentech. Dr. Klawiter receives funds from NIH K23NS078044, Abbvie, Biogen, EMD Serono, Genzyme, and Roche Genentech. Dr. Morrow?served on advisory boards for?Biogen Idec, EMD Serono, Genzyme Canada, Novartis, and Roche.?Dr. Morrow received Investigator Initiated Grant Funds from?Biogen Idec, Novartis, and Roche,?and?has acted as site PI for multi-center trials funded by Novartis, Genzyme, Roche, and AbbVie. Dr. Oz has no conflicts to declare. Dr. Oz receives funds from NIH: R01 NS080816 and P41 EB015894; the Institutional Center Cores for Advanced Neuroimaging: P30 NS076408. Dr. Rooney has no conflicts to declare. Dr. Rooney receives funds from the NIH: R01-EB007258 and R01NS40801; NMSS: RG 3168A1; C.N. Hilton Foundation MS Innovation Fund 20140260. Dr. Smith serves in the Board of Trustees for the Southeast NMSS. Dr. Smith receives funds from NIH: R01NS104149 and R01NS109114-01; NMSS: RG 1501?02840; C.N. Hilton Foundation MS Innovation Fund 17237; Novartis IIRP-1456. Dr. Calabresi received personal compensation for serving on scientific advisory boards from Disarm Therapeutics and Biogen Idec. Dr. Calabresi receives funds from NIH: R01NS082347, R37NS041435, and the NMSS. He is PI on grants from Biogen and Annexon to JHU. Dr. Oh serves on the Editorial Board of J Neuroimaging and receives funding from the MS Society of Canada, NMSS, Brain Canada, Biogen-Idec, Roche, and Sanofi-Genzyme. Dr. Oh has received personal compensation for consulting for Biogen-Idec, Celgene, Novartis, Sanofi-Genzyme, Roche, and EMD-Serono. Dr. Ontaneda received consulting fees from Biogen Idec, Genentech/Roche, Genzyme, Novartis, and Merck. Dr. Ontaneda has received research support from the NIH (R01NS091683 and R21NS106522), Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI MS-1610-37047) and the Department of Defense DOD (W81XWH-16-1-0446), the Race to Erase MS Foundation, Genentech, Genzyme, and Novartis. Dr. Pelletier received consulting fees from Alexion, Biogen, Genzyme, Novartis, and Roche. Dr. Reich received research funds via a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Vertex Pharmaceuticals, not connected to this paper. Dr. Reich is funded by the Intramural Research Program of NINDS. Dr. Shinohara has received consulting income from Genentech/Roche and compensation for editorial/reviewing duties from Research Square and the American Medical Association. Dr. Shinohara receives funds from NIH: R01 NS085211, R01 MH112847 and R01 NS060910) and the NMSS: RG-1707-28586 and PP-1901-33080. Dr. Sicotte has no conflicts to declare. Dr. Sicotte receives funds from the NMSS: RG1507-05418, PCORI: MS-1610-37115 and the Race to Erase MS: CAVS in Early MS.

Funding Information:
Dr. Bagnato serves in the Editorial Board of Journal of Neuroimaging, served on advisory boards for EMD Serono, acted as site PI for multi‐center trial funded by Novartis, acts as site PI for a multi‐center trial funded by EMD Serono, serves as consultant for Novartis. Dr. Bagnato receives funds from NIH: RO1 NS109114‐01; NMSS: PP‐1801‐29686 and RG 1807‐31051; and Biogen Idec. Dr. Gauthier serves in the Editorial Board of Journal of Neuroimaging and served as a consultant for Celgene. Dr. Gauthier receives funds from NIH: RO1 NS104283, RO1 NS105144, and R01 NS090464. Dr. Laule serves in the Editorial Board of Journal of Neuroimaging. Dr. Laule receives funds from the MS Society of Canada and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Dr. Moore has received a grant‐in‐aid of research from Berlex Canada and a teaching honorarium from Teva, and served as a consultant to Schering. Dr. Moore receives funds from the MS Society of Canada: EGID 3248. Dr. Bove served as a consultant for EMD‐Serono, Novartis, Roche Genentech, and Sanofi‐Genzyme. Dr. Bove receives funds from NMSS CA TA 3062‐A‐3; California Institute to Advance Precision Medicine and Hilton Foundation Grant 16850. Dr. Cai has no conflicts to declare. Dr. Cai receives funds from NIH: K01 EB023312 and R01 AG058773. Dr. Cohen‐Adad has no conflicts to declare. Dr. Cohen‐Adad receives funds from the Canada Research Chair in Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging: 950–230815; the Canadian Institute of Health Research: CIHR FDN‐143263; the Canada Foundation for Innovation (32454, 34824); the Fonds de Recherche du Québec: Santé 28826; the Fonds de Recherche du Québec ‐ Nature et Technologies: 2015‐PR‐182754; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada: RGPIN‐2019‐07244; Canada First Research Excellence Fund IVADO and TransMedTech; Quebec BioImaging Network: 5886, 35450. Dr. Harrison received consulting fees from EMD‐Serono, Genzyme, Biogen, and Genentech. Dr. Harrison receives funds from NIH: 1K23NS072366‐01A1 and 1R01NS104403‐01, NMSS: PP‐1804‐30760, EMD Serono, and Roche Genentech. Dr. Klawiter receives consulting fees from Alexion, Biogen, EMD Serono, and Genentech. Dr. Klawiter receives funds from NIH K23NS078044, Abbvie, Biogen, EMD Serono, Genzyme, and Roche Genentech. Dr. Morrow served on advisory boards for Biogen Idec, EMD Serono, Genzyme Canada, Novartis, and Roche. Dr. Morrow received Investigator Initiated Grant Funds from Biogen Idec, Novartis, and Roche, and has acted as site PI for multi‐center trials funded by Novartis, Genzyme, Roche, and AbbVie. Dr. Oz has no conflicts to declare. Dr. Oz receives funds from NIH: R01 NS080816 and P41 EB015894; the Institutional Center Cores for Advanced Neuroimaging: P30 NS076408. Dr. Rooney has no conflicts to declare. Dr. Rooney receives funds from the NIH: R01‐EB007258 and R01NS40801; NMSS: RG 3168A1; C.N. Hilton Foundation MS Innovation Fund 20140260. Dr. Smith serves in the Board of Trustees for the Southeast NMSS. Dr. Smith receives funds from NIH: R01NS104149 and R01NS109114‐01; NMSS: RG 1501–02840; C.N. Hilton Foundation MS Innovation Fund 17237; Novartis IIRP‐1456. Dr. Calabresi received personal compensation for serving on scientific advisory boards from Disarm Therapeutics and Biogen Idec. Dr. Calabresi receives funds from NIH: R01NS082347, R37NS041435, and the NMSS. He is PI on grants from Biogen and Annexon to JHU. Dr. Oh serves on the Editorial Board of J Neuroimaging and receives funding from the MS Society of Canada, NMSS, Brain Canada, Biogen‐Idec, Roche, and Sanofi‐Genzyme. Dr. Oh has received personal compensation for consulting for Biogen‐Idec, Celgene, Novartis, Sanofi‐Genzyme, Roche, and EMD‐Serono. Dr. Ontaneda received consulting fees from Biogen Idec, Genentech/Roche, Genzyme, Novartis, and Merck. Dr. Ontaneda has received research support from the NIH (R01NS091683 and R21NS106522), Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI MS‐1610‐37047) and the Department of Defense DOD (W81XWH‐16‐1‐0446), the Race to Erase MS Foundation, Genentech, Genzyme, and Novartis. Dr. Pelletier received consulting fees from Alexion, Biogen, Genzyme, Novartis, and Roche. Dr. Reich received research funds via a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Vertex Pharmaceuticals, not connected to this paper. Dr. Reich is funded by the Intramural Research Program of NINDS. Dr. Shinohara has received consulting income from Genentech/Roche and compensation for editorial/reviewing duties from Research Square and the American Medical Association. Dr. Shinohara receives funds from NIH: R01 NS085211, R01 MH112847 and R01 NS060910) and the NMSS: RG‐1707‐28586 and PP‐1901‐33080. Dr. Sicotte has no conflicts to declare. Dr. Sicotte receives funds from the NMSS: RG1507‐05418, PCORI: MS‐1610‐37115 and the Race to Erase MS: CAVS in Early MS.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 by the American Society of Neuroimaging

Keywords

  • Axons
  • chronic inflammation
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • multiple sclerosis
  • neurodegeneration

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