Imaging parallel fiber and climbing fiber responses and their short-term interactions in the mouse cerebellar cortex in vivo

Robert L Dunbar, Gang Chen, W. Gao, K. C. Reinert, R. Feddersen, Timothy J Ebner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

A major question in the study of cerebellar cortical function is how parallel fiber and climbing fiber inputs interact to shape information processing. Emphasis has been placed on the long-term effects due to conjunctive stimulation of climbing fibers and parallel fibers. Much less emphasis has been placed on short-term interactions and their spatial nature. To address this question the responses to parallel fiber and climbing fiber inputs and their short-term interaction were characterized using optical imaging with Neutral Red in the anesthetized mouse in vivo. Electrical stimulation of the cerebellar surface evoked an increase in fluorescence consisting of a transverse optical beam. The linear relationship between the optical responses and stimulus parameters, high spatial resolution and close coupling to the electrophysiological recordings show the utility of this imaging methodology. The majority of the optical response was due to activation of postsynaptic α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) and metabotropic glutamate receptors with a minor contribution from the presynaptic parallel fibers. Stimulation of the inferior olive evoked parasagittal bands that were abolished by blocking AMPA glutamate receptors. Conjunctive stimulation of the cerebellar surface and inferior olive resulted in inhibition of the climbing fiber evoked optical responses. This lateral inhibition of the parasagittal bands extended out from both sides of an activated parallel fiber beam and was mediated by GABAA but not GABAB receptors. One hypothesized role for lateral inhibition of this type is to spatially focus the interactions between parallel fiber and climbing fiber input on Purkinje cells. In summary optical imaging with Neutral Red permitted visualization of cerebellar cortical responses to parallel fiber and climbing fiber activation. The GABAA dependent lateral inhibition of the climbing fiber evoked parasagittal bands by parallel fiber stimulation shows that cerebellar interneurons play a short-term role in shaping the responses of Purkinje cells to climbing fiber input.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-227
Number of pages15
JournalNeuroscience
Volume126
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 24 2004

Keywords

  • (-)-bicuculline methochloride
  • AMPA
  • ANOVA
  • CIO
  • CNQX
  • GABA
  • Neutral Red
  • Purkinje cell
  • analysis of variance
  • bicuculline
  • contralateral inferior olive
  • lateral-inhibition
  • optical imaging
  • α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate

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