Incidental and Intentional Sequence Learning in Youth-Onset Psychosis and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Canan Karatekin, Tonya White, Christopher Bingham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

The goal was to compare incidental and intentional spatial sequence learning in youth-onset psychosis and ADHD. The authors tested 8- to 19-year-olds with psychosis or ADHD and healthy controls on a serial reaction time (RT) task and used manual and oculomotor measures to examine learning. Participants were also administered a block in which they were explicitly instructed to learn a sequence. As in our previous studies with healthy adults and children, oculomotor anticipations and RTs showed learning effects similar to those in the manual modality. Results showed intact sequence-specific learning but fewer oculomotor anticipations in both clinical groups during incidental learning. In intentional learning, only the psychosis group showed impairments compared to controls. There were no interactions between age and diagnosis. Thus, the psychosis group showed relatively preserved incidental learning despite impairments in intentional learning. Additionally, both clinical groups showed impairments in the ability to search for, extract, and anticipate regularities (whether the regularities were there or not), but not in the ability to respond to these regularities when they were there.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-459
Number of pages15
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • anticipations
  • oculomotor learning
  • sequence learning
  • youth-onset psychosis

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