Increase in body size is associated with an increased incidence of advanced adenomatous colon polyps in male veteran patients

Ali Siddiqui, Mimi Chang, Amar Mahgoub, Helene N Pena Sahdala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/Aims: Our aim was to determine how weight change influences the development of advanced adenomas. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of patients with adenomatous polyps (APs) on an index colonoscopy, and who also had a follow-up colonoscopy 3-5 years later. APs were evaluated for advanced features (i.e. size ≥1 cm in diameter and/or villous component and/or high-grade dysplasia). Patients were divided into 2 groups: those with no change or a reduction in their body mass index (BMI) during the interval between colonoscopies and those with an increase in BMI during the interval between colonoscopies. Results: 925 patients with a history of APs were identified. Univariate analysis showed that patients with an increase in BMI had more advanced APs (28 vs. 23%, p = 0.04), and a larger mean AP size (8.0 vs. 6.8 mm, p = 0.03) than those with a no change or decreased BMI. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that a decrease in BMI between colonoscopies was associated with a significantly reduced risk of developing advanced APs (OR: 0.4, 95% CI: 0.37-0.5, p < 0.05). Conclusions: An increase in weight in male veterans appears to be strongly associated with the development of clinically advanced AP lesions, even after adjustment for other known polyp risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)288-290
Number of pages3
JournalDigestion
Volume83
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Colon adenomatous polyps
  • Colorectal cancer

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