Indirect interaction webs on tall goldenrod: Community consequences of herbivore-induced phenotypes and genetic variation of plants

Takayuki Ohgushi, Yoshino Ando, Shunsuke Utsumi, Timothy P. Craig

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Tall goldenrod, Solidago altissima, was introduced from North America 100 years ago, and it has become widely distributed all over Japan. We have been investigating plant-based indirect interaction webs on the tall goldenrod in Japan and the US. We found that arthropod communities on Japanese goldenrods are organized via plant- and ant-mediated indirect effects caused by the dominant aphid, Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum, which came from the US in the early 1990s. The aphid also generated bottom-up cascading effects on temporally separated communities. Our results highlight the importance of herbivore-induced plant phenotypes in determining the structure of indirect interaction webs. We review our ongoing research that focuses on the effect of plant genotypic variation on the formation of indirect interaction webs. Our findings of the genotypic effects on aphid population dynamics and herbivore community composition provide a more complete understanding of the community consequences of plant genotypic diversity, as well as herbivore-induced plant phenotypes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-150
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Plant Interactions
Volume6
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (A-15207003 and B-20370010) to T. Ohgushi, the Global COE program (A06) of Kyoto University, and the JSPS Core-to-Core Program.

Keywords

  • Genetic variation
  • Indirect interaction web
  • Phenotypic plasticity

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Indirect interaction webs on tall goldenrod: Community consequences of herbivore-induced phenotypes and genetic variation of plants'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this