Influence of hay feeding method, supplement moisture, or access time on intake and waste by beef cows

Jeffery P. Jaderborg, Scott L. Bird, Grant I. Crawford, Ryon S. Walker, Alfredo Dicostanzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Experiments were performed to determine the effects of feeding method and hay processing (Experiment 1), energy supplement moisture content and feeding method (Experiment 2), and access time to hay (Experiment 3) on cow body weight (BW), dry matter intake (DMI), and hay or energy supplement intake and waste. Experiment 1 was designed as a 4 × 4 Latin Square using 48 multiparous, late-gestating, Angus cows (626 kg initial BW). Cows were stratified by age and BW into four treatment groups (n = 12 cows/group); treatment groups were then initially assigned randomly to treatments in a sequence of preset Latin Square periods. In Experiment 1, round bales were processed and delivered on the pen surface or in a bunk, or left unprocessed and delivered in a hay ring or rolled out on the pen surface. Experiment 2 was designed as a 6 × 6 Latin Square utilizing 54 multiparous, late-gestating, Angus cows (616 kg initial BW). Cows were stratified by age and BW into treatment groups (n = 9 cows/group); treatment groups were then initially assigned randomly to treatments in a sequence of preset Latin Square periods. In Experiment 2, corn screenings (CS) or wet beet pulp (BP) were fed in a structure (inverted tire or bunk) or BP only on the pen surface. Experiment 3 was designed as a replicated 3 × 3 Latin Square utilizing 24 multiparous, late-gestating, Angus cows (584 kg initial BW). Cows were stratified by age and BW into treatment groups (n = 8 cows/group); treatment groups were then initially assigned randomly to treatments in a sequence of preset Latin Square periods. In Experiment 3, cows were permitted access to round-bales in a hay ring for 6, 14, or 24 h. In Experiment 1, hay DMI was not affected (P ≥ 0.579). Hay waste was greater (P ≤ 0.007) when hay, processed or not, was fed on the pen surface. In Experiment 2, hay DMI was greatest (P ≤ 0.011) for cows fed no supplement and those fed CS in a bunk. Feeding BP in a bunk led to the greatest (P ≤ 0.003) hay waste. In Experiment 3, cows permitted 6-h access consumed and wasted less (P < 0.001) hay compared with those permitted longer access; BW was unaffected (P ≥ 0.870). In these experiments, cows fed hay on the pen surface, processed or not, achieved similar DMI as those fed in a ring or bunk, but wasted more hay. Delivering BP in a bunk or on the pen surface increased hay and supplement waste, respectively. Controlling access to hay reduced DMI and waste while maintaining cow BW.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbertxab069
JournalTranslational Animal Science
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society of Animal Science.

Keywords

  • access time
  • beef cows
  • hay
  • supplement

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