Influence of seasonality on the aerosol microbiome of the Amazon rainforest

Felipe F.C. Souza, Prince P. Mathai, Theotonio Pauliquevis, Eduardo Balsanelli, Fabio O. Pedrosa, Emanuel M. Souza, Valter A. Baura, Rose A. Monteiro, Leonardo M. Cruz, Rodrigo A.F. Souza, Meinrat O. Andreae, Cybelli G.G. Barbosa, Isabella Hrabe de Angelis, Beatriz Sánchez-Parra, Christopher Pӧhlker, Bettina Weber, Emil Ruff, Rodrigo A. Reis, Ricardo H.M. Godoi, Michael J. SadowskyLuciano F. Huergo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Amazon rainforest is the world's largest tropical forest, and this biome may be a significant contributor to primary biological aerosol (PBA) emissions on a global scale. These aerosols also play a pivotal role in modulating ecosystem dynamics, dispersing biological material over geographic barriers and influencing climate through radiation absorption, light scattering, or acting as cloud condensation nuclei. Despite their importance, there are limited studies investigating the effect of environmental variables on the bioaerosol composition in the Amazon rainforest. Here we present a 16S rRNA gene-based amplicon sequencing approach to investigate the bacterial microbiome in aerosols of the Amazon rainforest during distinct seasons and at different heights above the ground. Our data revealed that seasonal changes in temperature, relative humidity, and precipitation are the primary drivers of compositional changes in the Amazon rainforest aerosol microbiome. Interestingly, no significant differences were observed in the bacterial community composition of aerosols collected at ground and canopy levels. The core airborne bacterial families present in Amazon aerosol were Enterobacteriaceae, Beijerinckiaceae, Polyangiaceae, Bacillaceae and Ktedonobacteraceae. By correlating the bacterial taxa identified in the aerosol with literature data, we speculate that the phyllosphere may be one possible source of airborne bacteria in the Amazon rainforest. Results of this study indicate that the aerosol microbiota of the Amazon Rainforest are fairly diverse and principally impacted by seasonal changes in temperature and humidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number144092
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume760
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was funded, in large part, by INCT Fixação Biológica de Nitrogênio , Fundação Araucária , FINEP , CAPES and CNPq and the logistical support from LBA, INPA and UEA. For the operation of the ATTO site. We also acknowledge the support by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF contract nos. 01LB1001A and 01LK1602B ), the Brazilian Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (MCTI/FINEP contract 01.11.01248.00 ), the Amazon State University (UEA), FAPEAM , LBA/ INPA , and SDS/CEUC/RDS-Uatumã and the micrometeorology group of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia program.

Funding Information:
This study was funded, in large part, by INCT Fixa??o Biol?gica de Nitrog?nio, Funda??o Arauc?ria, FINEP, CAPES and CNPq and the logistical support from LBA, INPA and UEA. For the operation of the ATTO site. We also acknowledge the support by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF contract nos. 01LB1001A and 01LK1602B), the Brazilian Minist?rio da Ci?ncia, Tecnologia e Inova??o (MCTI/FINEP contract 01.11.01248.00), the Amazon State University (UEA), FAPEAM, LBA/INPA, and SDS/CEUC/RDS-Uatum? and the micrometeorology group of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia program. This paper contains results of research conducted under the Technical/Scientific Cooperation Agreement between the National Institute for Amazonian Research, the State University of Amazonas, and the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft e.V. The opinions expressed are the entire responsibility of the authors and not of the participating institutions. We are grateful to Daniel V. Rissi for initial inspection of sequencing data.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • 16S rRNA gene sequencing
  • Bacterial composition
  • Bioaerosol
  • Biodiversity
  • Rainforest

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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