Information technology and information asymmetry: The future of private individual health insurance

Eric K. Clemons, Matt E. Thatcher, Barry Blecherman, David Croson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The amount of available information, and the statistical ability to find patterns in it fundamentally alter risk pooling. This threatens to alter the structure of the insurance industry, and potentially to destroy insurability, as we will see. While too much information destroys risk pooling and rating, too little information, or one party with far more information than the other, likewise can destroy the structure of the industry. The regulatory implications, not yet understood, will be profound.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInformation Systems - Organizational Systems and Technology
Editors Anon
Pages240-248
Number of pages9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1997 30th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. Part 1 (of 6) - Wailea, HI, USA
Duration: Jan 7 1997Jan 10 1997

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
Volume3
ISSN (Print)1060-3425

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1997 30th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. Part 1 (of 6)
CityWailea, HI, USA
Period1/7/971/10/97

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