Integration of laboratory and epidemiologic studies to evaluate genotoxic exposure in tool and die workers.

V. F. Garry, D. R. Jacobs, R. A. Kreiger, R. L. Nelson, R. Loeppky, M. E. Harkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

In summary, the data presented here provides perspective on the analysis of cancer in a relatively small population of tool and die workers. Each part of the effort establishes evidence for or against the presence of a workplace carcinogenic effect. Overall, the weight of evidence leads to the hypothesis that cutting fluids are a likely candidate for observed increases in urinary system cancer and perhaps other sites. Because cutting fluids and a wide variety of metals are used together, the interaction of these entities need be considered in the overall process of carcinogenesis in the workplace.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-193
Number of pages11
JournalProgress in Clinical and Biological Research
Volume207
StatePublished - 1986

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