Internet use among childhood and young adult cancer survivors who smoke: Implications for cessation interventions

Rebekah H. Nagler, Elaine Puleo, Kim Sprunck-Harrild, Karen M. Emmons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To identify patterns of Internet use among childhood and young adult cancer survivors who smoke. Methods: Baseline assessment data were collected from 2005 to 2008 for the Partnership for Health-2 (PFH-2) study, a web-based smoking cessation intervention for childhood and young adult cancer survivors. Participants were surveyed about their Internet access and use. Sociodemographic, clinical, and psychosocial data also were collected. Results: Internet access and use was widespread among PFH-2 participants. However, older, less-educated, and female survivors reported less frequent Internet use, even when they had access to the Internet at home and/or at work. These associations were significant in multivariable analyses. Conclusions: Although the digital divide is narrowing, Internet use and engagement remains socially patterned. web-based prevention interventions are a promising method of reaching this geographically dispersed, high-risk population, but certain subgroups - particularly older and lower socioeconomic status survivors - might be missed by this approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)647-652
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

Keywords

  • Childhood cancer survival
  • Internet use
  • Internet-based interventions
  • Smoking cessation

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