Intraparaventricular neuropeptide Y and ghrelin induce learned behaviors that report food deprivation in rats

David C. Jewett, Timothy W. Lefever, Douglas P. Flashinski, Mikhail N. Koffarnus, Constance R. Cameron, Daniel J. Hehli, Martha K. Grace, Allen S Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rats were trained to discriminate between 2 and 22-h food deprivation in a choice paradigm. During tests, 20 min of food consumption eliminated internal stimuli associated with 22-h food deprivation. In other tests, rats food-restricted for 2 h were given neuropeptide Y or ghrelin by administration into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Both neurochemicals induced effects similar to those following 22-h food restriction (increased behavior appropriate for 22-h deprivation). These findings suggest that internal stimuli produced by 22-h food deprivation are altered by food consumption and mimicked by feeding-inducing neurochemicals administered into a brain area associated with feeding regulation. Thus, hunger discrimination is a useful model to examine neurochemical and dietary factors that alter internal states associated with eating.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)733-737
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroreport
Volume17
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2006

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Discrimination
  • Eating
  • Food intake
  • Ghrelin
  • Hunger
  • Neuropeptide Y
  • Obesity
  • Operant

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