Intrathoracic pressure regulation improves 24-hour survival in a pediatric porcine model of hemorrhagic shock

Anja Metzger, Timothy Matsuura, Scott McKnite, Bradley S. Marino, Vinay M. Nadkarni, Demetris Yannopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hemorrhagic shock is a common cause of mortality and morbidity in the pediatric population. Intrathoracic pressure regulation (IPR) lowers intrathoracic pressure, thereby decreasing intracranial pressure and increasing venous return, cardiac output, and cerebral perfusion without the need for immediate fluid resuscitation. We hypothesized that IPR would improve hemodynamics and 24-h survival in a pediatric porcine model of hemorrhagic shock. Twenty piglets were subjected to a 50% total blood volume hemorrhage over 15 min and then randomized to treatment with either IPR or no treatment. After 60 min, survivors were autotransfused, weaned from the ventilator, and assessed and autopsied at 24 h. Mean arterial pressures (MAPs), cardiac index (CI), and arterial blood gases were recorded. MAP (mm Hg) was significantly higher in the IPR group (60.8 ± 3.7) versus controls (41.2 ± 4.6, p < 0.01). Mean CI (L/min/m) was significantly higher with IPR (3.9 ± 0.24) versus controls (2.5 ± 0.39, p < 0.01). IPR survival rates were significantly improved with IPR [9/9 (IPR) versus 5/11 (controls); p < 0.02]. In this piglet model of hemorrhagic shock, IPR treatment safely and significantly improved MAP, CI, and 24-h survival rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-271
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Research
Volume70
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

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