Intuitive Eating is Associated With Higher Fruit and Vegetable Intake Among Adults

Mary J. Christoph, Vivienne M. Hazzard, Elina Järvelä-Reijonen, Laura Hooper, Nicole Larson, Dianne Neumark-Sztainer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Assess how intuitive eating relates to dietary intake. Methods: Survey data were collected in Project Eating and Activity in Teens and Young Adults, the fourth wave of a longitudinal cohort study (weighted n = 1,830, 49% women; mean age = 31 years). Intuitive eating was assessed using a 7-item scale adapted from the Intuitive Eating Scale and Intuitive Eating Scale-2. Dietary intake was measured via a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Mean servings were stratified by gender and intuitive eating quartiles and adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and caloric intake. Results: Women and men in the top intuitive eating quartile consumed 0.6–0.3 servings more fruit and 0.4–0.6 servings more vegetables daily, respectively, compared with the bottom quartile, whereas men in the top quartile also consumed 0.6 servings fewer whole grains (all P < 0.05) than the bottom quartile. Conclusions and Implications: Intuitive eating shows promise as a healthier alternative to practices such as dieting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)240-245
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Data collection was supported by Grant Number R01HL116892 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (PI: Dianne Neumark-Sztainer). The authors? time to conduct and describe the analysis reported within this manuscript was supported by Grant Number R35HL139853 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (PI: D. Neumark-Sztainer). MJC was supported by grant T32HP22239 from the Health Resources and Services Administration of the US Department of Health and Human Services under the National Research Service Award in Primary Medical Care (PI: I. Borowsky). VMH was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health through grant T32MH082761 (PI: S. Crow). The authors thank the Project EAT team and participants. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; the National Institute of Mental Health; the National Institutes of Health; or the Health Resources and Services Administration.

Funding Information:
Data collection was supported by Grant Number R01HL116892 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (PI: Dianne Neumark-Sztainer). The authors’ time to conduct and describe the analysis reported within this manuscript was supported by Grant Number R35HL139853 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (PI: D. Neumark-Sztainer). MJC was supported by grant T32HP22239 from the Health Resources and Services Administration of the US Department of Health and Human Services under the National Research Service Award in Primary Medical Care (PI: I. Borowsky). VMH was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health through grant T32MH082761 (PI: S. Crow). The authors thank the Project EAT team and participants. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; the National Institute of Mental Health; the National Institutes of Health; or the Health Resources and Services Administration.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021

Keywords

  • appetite regulation
  • diet
  • dietary intake
  • healthy
  • intuitive eating

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