Is altruism enough? Required request and the donation of cadaver organs and tissues in the United States

A. L. Caplan, B. Virnig

Research output: Contribution to journalShort surveypeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

The lack of an adequate supply of cadaver organs and tissues for transplantation to those in need poses a major challenge to the transplant community and to those responsible for public policy. Historically, Americans have relied upon a combination of altruism and voluntarism to generate an adequate supply of cadaver organs and tissues. The ongoing shortage of organs and tissues has led, in recent years, for calls to abandon these values in favor of either a market system or a system of presumed consent. A survey of the impact of the federal and state laws that require that requests be made to next of kin for organ and tissue donation when a death occurs in a hospital setting shows that inadequate efforts have been made to implement these laws. Before abandoning altruism and voluntarism, health care professionals must insist that zealous efforts in education, enforcement, and coordination be made to implement these new laws and regulations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1007-1018
Number of pages12
JournalCritical Care Clinics
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Is altruism enough? Required request and the donation of cadaver organs and tissues in the United States'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this