Keratinocyte growth factor administered before conditioning ameliorates graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

114 Scopus citations

Abstract

Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is important in tissue repair and wound healing and its administration can abrogate chemical- and radiation-induced tissue damage in rodents. We investigated KGF as a therapeutic agent for the prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-induced tissue damage, morbidity, and mortality in an established murine allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) model. B10.BR (H2(k)) recipient mice were lethally irradiated and transplanted with C57BL/6 (H2(b)) bone marrow (BM) with spleen cells (BMS) as a source of GVHD-causing T cells. KGF-treated mice (5 mg/kg/d subcutaneously days -6, -5, and -4 pre-BMT) receiving BMS exhibited better survival than those not receiving KGF (P = .0027). Cyclophosphamide (Cy), a common component of total body irradiation (TBI)-containing regimens, was administered to other cohorts of mice at a dose of 120 mg/kg/d intraperitoneally on days -3 and -2 before BMT. KGF-treated mice again exhibited a better survival rate than those not receiving KGF (P = .00086). However, KGF-treated recipients receiving TBI or Cy/TBI BMS were not GVHD- free, as shown by lower body weights compared with BM groups. GVHD target tissues were assessed histologically during a 38-day post-BMT observation period. KGF ameliorated GVHD-induced tissue damage in the liver, skin, and lung (completely in some recipients) and moderately so in the spleen, colon, and ileum, even with Cy conditioning. These studies demonstrate that KGF administration, completed before conditioning, has potential as an anti-GVHD therapeutic agent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3960-3967
Number of pages8
JournalBlood
Volume92
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 1998

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Keratinocyte growth factor administered before conditioning ameliorates graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this