Lack of Benefit of Ursodeoxycholic Acid in Drug-Induced Cholestasis in the Rat

Jennifer Hillstrom, William C. Duane, John H. Eckfeldt, Julie Furne, Michael D. Levitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The administration of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been reported to improve cholestasis in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis or sclerosing cholangitis. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that UDCA similarly might reduce cholestasis induced by drugs. Rats were treated with three different drugs reported to induce cholestasis: 17α-ethynylestradiol, α-napthylisothiocyanate, and cyclosporine A. UDCA administration (0.4·g/day-1 k-1 before and during administration of the cholestatic drug) did not improve survival, food intake, or serum indicators of cholestasis in any of these three animal models of cholestasis. To the extent that drug-induced cholestasis in rats mimics the human situation, we conclude that UDCA probably will not be beneficial in drug-induced cholestasis in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-126
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine
Volume200
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1992

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