Letter-case-specific priming in the right cerebral hemisphere with a form-specific perceptual identification task

E. Darcy Burgund, Chad J. Marsolek

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65 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a form-specific perceptual identification task, subjects identify and write letter strings in the same letter case as they appear on a computer display. Letter-case-specific repetition priming was observed in this task when test items were presented directly to the right hemisphere, but not when they were presented directly to the left hemisphere, similar to results in previous word-stem completion experiments. This pattern of results was not obtained in a standard perceptual identification task. Results indicate that a specific visual-form subsystem, but not an abstract visual-form subsystem, operates more effectively in the right hemisphere than in the left, and task demands greatly affect which subsystems are recruited in different priming tests.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-258
Number of pages20
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1997

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, Grant MH53959-01, and grants from the McDonnell-Pew Cognitive Neuroscience Center and the Arizona Cognitive Science Program. An earlier version of this research was reported at the 3rd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, San Francisco, 1996.

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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