Living a calling and work well-being: A longitudinal study

Ryan D. Duffy, Blake A. Allan, Kelsey L. Autin, Richard P Douglass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study examined the link between living a calling and career commitment, work meaning, and job satisfaction with a diverse group of working adults at 3 time points over a 6-month period. Using structural equation modeling, 3 models were tested that hypothesized that living a calling would predict career commitment, work meaning, and job satisfaction over time. However, counter to hypotheses, living a calling was best positioned as an outcome of each of these variables. Specifically, living a calling at Time 2 and Time 3 was significantly predicted by career commitment, work meaning, and job satisfaction at Time 1 and Time 2, respectively. Time 2 living a calling did predict Time 3 work career commitment and work meaning, but these effects were small. Results suggest that over time, individuals who feel committed to their career, derive more meaning from their work, and are more satisfied with their jobs are more likely to feel they are living a calling. Practical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)605-615
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Calling
  • Career commitment
  • Job satisfaction
  • Work meaning

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