Long-term incidence and risk of noncardiovascular and all-cause mortality in apparently healthy cats and cats with preclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Philip R. Fox, Bruce W. Keene, Kenneth Lamb, Karsten E. Schober, Valérie Chetboul, Virginia Luis Fuentes, Jessie Rose Payne, Gerhard Wess, Daniel F. Hogan, Jonathan A. Abbott, Jens Häggström, Geoffrey Culshaw, Deborah Fine-Ferreira, Etienne Cote, Emilie Trehiou-Sechi, Alison A. Motsinger-Reif, Reid K. Nakamura, Manreet Singh, Wendy A. Ware, Sabine C. RiesenMichele Borgarelli, John E. Rush, Andrea Vollmar, Michael B. Lesser, Nicole Van Israel, Pamela Ming Show Lee, Barret Bulmer, Roberto Santilli, Maribeth J. Bossbaly, Nadine Quick, Claudio Bussadori, Janice Bright, Amara H. Estrada, Dan G. Ohad, Maria Josefa Fernández del Palacio, Jennifer Lunney Brayley, Denise S. Schwartz, Sonya G. Gordon, Seung Woo Jung, Christina M. Bove, Paola G. Brambilla, N. Sydney Moïse, Christopher Stauthammer, Cecilia Quintavalla, Ferenc Manczur, Rebecca L. Stepien, Carmel Mooney, Yong Wei Hung, Remo Lobetti, Alice Tamborini, Mark A. Oyama, Andrey Komolov, Yoko Fujii, Romain Pariaut, Masami Uechi, Victoria Yukie Tachika Ohara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Epidemiologic knowledge regarding noncardiovascular and all-cause mortality in apparently healthy cats (AH) and cats with preclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (pHCM) is limited, hindering development of evidence-based healthcare guidelines. Objectives: To characterize/compare incidence rates, risk, and survival associated with noncardiovascular and all-cause mortality in AH and pHCM cats. Animals: A total of 1730 client-owned cats (722 AH, 1008 pHCM) from 21 countries. Methods: Retrospective, multicenter, longitudinal, cohort study. Long-term health data were extracted by medical record review and owner/referring veterinarian interviews. Results: Noncardiovascular death occurred in 534 (30.9%) of 1730 cats observed up to 15.2 years. Proportion of noncardiovascular death did not differ significantly between cats that at study enrollment were AH or had pHCM (P =.48). Cancer, chronic kidney disease, and conditions characterized by chronic weight-loss-vomiting-diarrhea-anorexia were the most frequently recorded noncardiovascular causes of death. Incidence rates/risk of noncardiac death increased with age in AH and pHCM. All-cause death proportions were greater in pHCM than AH (65% versus 40%, respectively; P <.001) because of higher cardiovascular mortality in pHCM cats. Comparing AH with pHCM, median survival (study entry to noncardiovascular death) did not differ (AH, 9.8 years; pHCM, 8.6 years; P =.10), but all-cause survival was significantly shorter in pHCM (P =.0001). Conclusions and Clinical Importance: All-cause mortality was significantly greater in pHCM cats due to disease burden contributed by increased cardiovascular death superimposed upon noncardiovascular death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2572-2586
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of veterinary internal medicine
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

Keywords

  • cancer
  • chronic kidney disease
  • epidemiology
  • mortality
  • survival

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