Longitudinal Associations Between Family Dinner and Adolescent Perceptions of Parent-Child Communication Among Racially Diverse Urban Youth

Jayne Fulkerson, Keryn E. Pasch, Melissa H. Stigler, Kian Farbakhsh, Cheryl L. Perry, Kelli A. Komro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined changes in adolescent self-reported parent-child communication using growth curve models conditional on family meal frequency over a 3.5-year period among a population of racially diverse, low-income adolescents from an urban environment (n = 4,750). Results indicated that although both family dinner frequency and adolescent perceptions of parent-child communication scores were characterized by negative linear growth over time (both p < .001), family dinner frequency was positively associated with adolescent perceptions of parent-child communication scores over time (p < .001). Study findings suggest that families with teenagers may enhance parent-child communication and ultimately promote healthy adolescent development by making family dinner a priority. In addition, the communication benefits of family dinner at the beginning of sixth grade may be protective through eighth grade.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-270
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • family dinner
  • family meals
  • parent-child communication
  • urban

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