Low-income mothers' decisions regarding when and why to introduce solid foods to their infants: Influencing factors

Mildred Horodynski, Beth Olson, Mary Jo Arndt, Holly Brophy-Herb, Karen Shirer, Rosalie Shemanski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Preventive measures for long-life illnesses such as asthma, obesity, and diabetes can start as early as in infant feeding practices. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends introducing babies to solid foods, anything other than breast milk or formula, no earlier than 4-6 months of age (Kleinman, 2004). This study's1 purpose was to assess beliefs and attitudes of mothers enrolled in Medicaid about the introduction of solid foods and other infant feeding behaviors. Six focus groups (N = 23) were conducted with Black and Caucasian mothers with infants under 1 year old. The Theory of Planned Behavior was used as a framework for moderator questions and interpretation of themes. Maternal knowledge about infant feeding, maternal perceptions of applicability of infant feeding guidelines, and manner and type of information useful for infant feeding decisions emerged as themes. Implications of themes for informing an educational program for mothers to delay the introduction of solid foods are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-118
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Community Health Nursing
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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