Measurement equivalence and latent mean differences of personality scores across different media and proctoring administration conditions

Gargi Sawhney, Konstantin P. Cigularov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite substantial interest and research in measuring personality, little is known about the measurement equivalence and mean differences in scores on personality measures across different administration conditions. The aim of the present study was to assess measurement equivalence and latent and observed mean differences of scores on the Big Five factor markers from the International Personality Item Pool across three conditions: paper-and-pencil proctored, computer-based proctored, and computer-based non-proctored. Undergraduate students (N = 401) from a Midwestern university responded to the personality questionnaire in one of the three conditions. Results indicated configural, metric, scalar, and invariant uniqueness equivalence for four of the five scales across the three conditions; Conscientiousness scores showed partial metric equivalence across computer-based proctored and computer-based non-proctored conditions. Apart from latent and observed mean differences for Emotional Stability scores in paper-and-pencil proctored vs. computer-based non-proctored conditions, no significant differences were found for the other four personality scales. These findings justify both collection and comparison of personality data using the Big Five factor markers and similar personality assessments across the three conditions. Future research should attempt to replicate the findings of the current study in high-stakes environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-421
Number of pages10
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume36
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014

Keywords

  • Computer-based test
  • Latent means
  • Measurement equivalence
  • Paper-and-pencil test
  • Personality
  • Proctoring

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