Mechanical integration of muscle, tegument, and subtegumental tissues by anchoring fibrils and microfibrils in the cestode Hymenolepis diminuta

Jon M. Holy, John A. Oaks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Electron microscopic examination of the epidermal basement membrane region of the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta, has revealed specialized connective tissue structures that appear to anchor the epidermis, or tegument, to the parenchymal tissues of the helminth, as well as interconnect subtegumental muscle fibers, tegument, and parenchyma. Anchoring fibrils-cross-banded bundles of ca. 3 nm diameter filaments-were observed to directly interlink tegument and muscle, muscle and muscle, and tegument, muscle, and parenchymal connective tissue. Anchoring fibrils therefore appear to mechanically integrate epidermal tissue movements in response to subtegumental muscle contraction. A well-developed stratum of microfibrils, forming the lamina reticularis of the tegumental basement membrane, may also help anchor the tegument as well as to serve as a flexible, reinforcing sheath that protects parenchymal tissues from excessive radial displacement due to muscle contraction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)881-891
Number of pages11
JournalTissue and Cell
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987

Keywords

  • Anchoring fibrils
  • Hymenolepis diminuta
  • basement membrane
  • microfibrils
  • tapeworm
  • tegument

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