Mental models change rapidly with implicitly acquired information about the local environment: A two-tone image study

Cassandra Moore, Stephen A. Engel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The projection of 3-D objects to 2-D images necessitates a loss of information, thus the shape of volumetric objects depicted in images is inherently ambiguous. The results of 3 experiments suggest observers use mental models of the local visual environment to constrain image interpretation. These models change quickly and dramatically to accommodate implicitly acquired information. Observers viewed very high-contrast (2-tone) images of novel volumetric objects. Before priming, novel 2-tone images appeared 2-D. After incidental exposure to similar objects in grayscale or familiar objects in 2-tone, the test images appeared volumetric. Incidental learning appears to alter observers' mental models, thus causing an alteration in image interpretation in the absence of any image change. Highlights were interpreted more accurately than shadows, suggesting shadows play a secondary role in shape recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1211-1228
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Mental models change rapidly with implicitly acquired information about the local environment: A two-tone image study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this