Minimal specifications for non-human primate MRI: Challenges in standardizing and harmonizing data collection

Joonas A. Autio, Qi Zhu, Xiaolian Li, Matthew F. Glasser, Caspar M. Schwiedrzik, Damien A. Fair, Jan Zimmermann, Essa Yacoub, Ravi S. Menon, David C. Van Essen, Takuya Hayashi, Brian Russ, Wim Vanduffel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Recent methodological advances in MRI have enabled substantial growth in neuroimaging studies of non-human primates (NHPs), while open data-sharing through the PRIME-DE initiative has increased the availability of NHP MRI data and the need for robust multi-subject multi-center analyses. Streamlined acquisition and analysis protocols would accelerate and improve these efforts. However, consensus on minimal standards for data acquisition protocols and analysis pipelines for NHP imaging remains to be established, particularly for multi-center studies. Here, we draw parallels between NHP and human neuroimaging and provide minimal guidelines for harmonizing and standardizing data acquisition. We advocate robust translation of widely used open-access toolkits that are well established for analyzing human data. We also encourage the use of validated, automated pre-processing tools for analyzing NHP data sets. These guidelines aim to refine methodological and analytical strategies for small and large-scale NHP neuroimaging data. This will improve reproducibility of results, and accelerate the convergence between NHP and human neuroimaging strategies which will ultimately benefit fundamental and translational brain science.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number118082
JournalNeuroImage
Volume236
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We express gratitude to the Primate Neuroimaging Data-Exchange (PRIME-DE) initiative and to all institutions that contributed to the PRIME-DE dataset. Human data were provided by the Human Connectome Project, WU-Minn Consortium (Principal Investigators: David Van Essen and Kamil Ugurbil; 1U54MH091657) funded by the 16 NIH Institutes and Centers that support the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research; and by the McDonnell Center for Systems Neuroscience at Washington University. This research is partially supported by the program for Brain/MINDS and Brain/MINDS-beyond from Japan Agency for Medical Research and development, AMED (JP20dm037006, T.H.), by RIKEN Compass to Healthy Life Research Complex Program from Japan Science and Technology Agency, JST, by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP20K15945 (J.A.A.), by the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant agreement No. 802482, C.M.S.), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research FRN-148453 and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Discovery Grant (R.S.M), EB027061 (J.Z.), DA048742 (J.Z.), NSF-2024581 (J.Z.), UMN Digital Technologies Initiative (J.Z.), UMN AIRP (J.Z.), Lynne and Andrew Redleaf Foundation (D.A.F.), DA041148 (D.A.F.), DA04112 (D.A.F.), MH115357 (D.A.F.), MH096773 (D.A.F), RF1 MH116978 (E.Y.), P50NS098573 (E.Y.), the Emmy Noether Program of the German Research Foundation (SCHW1683/2-1, C.M.S), NIH Grant MH-060974 (D.C.V.E.) NIH Grant BRAINS R01-MH101555 and RF1MH117040 (B.E.R) and KU Leuven grant C14/17/109; Fonds Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek-Vlaanderen (FWO) G0D5817N, G0B8617N, G0C1920N, G0E0520N, VS02219N; and the European Union's Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research and Innovation under Grant Agreement No 945539 (Human Brain Project SGA3) (W.V). The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

Funding Information:
We express gratitude to the Primate Neuroimaging Data-Exchange (PRIME-DE) initiative and to all institutions that contributed to the PRIME-DE dataset. Human data were provided by the Human Connectome Project, WU-Minn Consortium (Principal Investigators: David Van Essen and Kamil Ugurbil; 1U54MH091657) funded by the 16 NIH Institutes and Centers that support the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research; and by the McDonnell Center for Systems Neuroscience at Washington University. This research is partially supported by the program for Brain/MINDS and Brain/MINDS-beyond from Japan Agency for Medical Research and development, AMED (JP20dm037006, T.H.), by RIKEN Compass to Healthy Life Research Complex Program from Japan Science and Technology Agency, JST, by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP20K15945 (J.A.A.), by the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant agreement No. 802482, C.M.S.), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research FRN-148453 and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Discovery Grant (R.S.M), EB027061 (J.Z.), DA048742 (J.Z.), NSF-2024581 (J.Z.), UMN Digital Technologies Initiative (J.Z.), UMN AIRP (J.Z.), Lynne and Andrew Redleaf Foundation (D.A.F.), DA041148 (D.A.F.), DA04112 (D.A.F.), MH115357 (D.A.F.), MH096773 (D.A.F), RF1 MH116978 (E.Y.), P50NS098573 (E.Y.), the Emmy Noether Program of the German Research Foundation (SCHW1683/2-1, C.M.S), NIH Grant MH-060974 (D.C.V.E.) NIH Grant BRAINS R01-MH101555 and RF1MH117040 (B.E.R) and KU Leuven grant C14/17/109; Fonds Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek-Vlaanderen (FWO) G0D5817N, G0B8617N, G0C1920N, G0E0520N, VS02219N; and the European Union's Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research and Innovation under Grant Agreement No 945539 (Human Brain Project SGA3) (W.V). The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021

Keywords

  • MRI
  • Multi-site
  • Non-human primate
  • PRIME-DE
  • Standardization

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

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