Minnesota physician workforce analysis: rural supply and demand.

Sally T. Buck, Vicki Trauba, Raymond G. Christensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Considering the physician supply in 2002, the potential number of new physicians, and the number of vacancies that year, rural Minnesota has shortages in the following specialties: family practice, internal medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, pediatrics, general surgery, gastroenterology, ophthalmology, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology, psychiatry, and urology. Metropolitan areas have fewer shortages; however, there is a gap between supply and demand in obstetrics/gynecology, gastroenterology, general surgery, otolaryngology, and urology. Future areas of concern for all parts of the state include family practice, internal medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, pediatrics, cardiology, general surgery, psychiatry, ophthalmology, orthopedic surgery, and urology. In Minnesota, with several specialties facing a substantial number of retirements in the next 10 years, the number of new physicians completing graduate medical education remaining steady or declining, and the population growing--especially among people ages 65 to 84, the current shortages may increase, and additional specialties may experience a gap if the supply is not increased.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-43
Number of pages4
JournalMinnesota medicine
Volume87
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2004

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