More than talking animals: Charles alexander eastman's animal peoples and their kinship critiques of United States colonialism

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Abstract

Red Hunters and the Animal People (1904), an early collection of stories for children by Charles Alexander Eastman, a Dakot.a author, was largely viewed by his critical contemporaries as a politically innocuous analogue to Kipling's Jungle Book Stories. hrough consideration of the Dakot.a oral- historical genre of hi tu?ka?ka?pi ("long ago stories") and of Dakot. a peoplehood more broadly, this article proposes an alternative view of Eastman as a resistance writer who cited a long- circulating Dakot. a kinship philosophy to criticize the enduring conditions of United States settler colonialisma-a criticism that would become more pointed in his later, better- known autobiography, From the Deep Woods to Civilization (1915). In viewing Eastman's animal tales as opposed to United States colonialism, we may see more clearly his innovative translations of Dakot. a politics into narratives that both appealed to and challenged United States settler society. hese challenges were made in relation to Dakot. a conceptions of peoplehood, power, and git.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)652-667
Number of pages16
JournalPMLA
Volume131
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2016

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