Negative alcohol-related consequences experienced by young adults in the past 12 months: Differences by college attendance, living situation, binge drinking, and sex

Megan E. Patrick, Yvonne M. Terry-McElrath, Rebecca J. Evans-Polce, John E. Schulenberg

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    1 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Purpose: This study estimated the prevalence of negative consequences associated with alcohol use in a national sample of young adults one or two years after graduating from high school, focusing on differences by college attendance, living situation, binge drinking, and sex. Methods: A subsample (N = .1068) of U.S. nationally representative Monitoring the Future study 12th grade students from 2006 to 2016 cohorts was followed-up at modal age 19 or 20 (in 2008–2017) and asked about negative consequences related to their own alcohol use during the past 12 months. Differences in prevalence were estimated and multivariable models examined associations with college attendance, living situation, binge drinking, and sex. Results: Half of surveyed U.S. 19/20 year-old alcohol users (a third of non-binge drinkers and almost three-quarters of binge drinkers) experienced negative consequences in the past year. The likelihood of experiencing several consequence types was significantly associated with college attendance prior to controlling for living situation. In multivariable models controlling for living situation, unsafe driving due to drinking remained more likely for students attending 2-year colleges or vocational/technical schools than for 4-year college students or non-attenders. In general, negative consequence risk was elevated among young adults not living with parents (vs. those living with parents) and women (vs. men). Conclusion: Negative consequences from alcohol use are prevalent among young adults and differ by college attendance, living situation, binge drinking, and sex. Students at 2-year/vocational/technical schools are at particular risk for unsafe driving, warranting specific research attention and targeted intervention.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article number106320
    JournalAddictive Behaviors
    Volume105
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 2020

    Bibliographical note

    Funding Information:
    Development of this manuscript was supported by research grants including R01DA037902 from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (to M. E Patrick) and R01AA023504 (to M. E. Patrick) and R01 AA026861 (to K. Keyes & J. Jager) from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Data collection and manuscript preparation were supported by research grants R01DA001411 (to R. Miech and L. Johnston) and R01DA016575 (to J. Schulenberg and L. Johnston) from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The study sponsors had no role in the study design, collection, analysis, or interpretation of the data, writing of the manuscript, or the decision to submit the paper for publication. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the study sponsors.

    Publisher Copyright:
    © 2020 Elsevier Ltd

    Copyright:
    Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

    Keywords

    • Alcohol
    • Binge drinking
    • College
    • Consequences
    • Living situation
    • Young adult

    PubMed: MeSH publication types

    • Journal Article
    • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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