Neutrophil elastase in crevicular fluid: comparison of a middle‐aged general population with healthy and periodontitis groups

Q. T. Smith, L. Harriman, G. S. Au, J. L. Stoltenberg, J. B. Osborn, D. M. Aeppli, G. Fischer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract Neutrophil elastase (NE) was measured in crevicular fluid (GCF) collected from 3 subject groups. GCF was harvested at a single visit of subjects with periodontal health (n=21) and with periodontitis (n=28). Samples were obtained from 132 middle‐aged, middle‐class health conscious patients of a health maintenance organization (HMO) at baseline and 1 year later. GCF NE was higher in periodontitis than in health. Mean GCF NE of HMO subjects was much closer to health than to periodontitis. Few members of the HMO population had enzyme levels typical of periodontitis. Subjects and sites of the HMO population were segregated into 3 categories based on enzyme levels of the healthy and periodontitis subjects. Most HMO subjects and sites were in the activity category corresponding to healthy subjects. Only a small portion were in the activity category common in periodontitis. Enzyme levels in the highest activity category at both samplings were infrequent. High enzyme levels in the HMO population were not associated with attachment loss. Thus, assay of GCF NB provided little evidence of disease in a middle‐aged, middle‐class health conscious general population. This finding confirms an analysis of epidemiological surveys which concluded that a population such as studied here would not benefit from periodontal diagnostic testing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)935-941
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of clinical periodontology
Volume22
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1995

Keywords

  • crevicular fluid
  • neutrophil elastase
  • periodontal disease markers
  • periodontal health

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