Noninvasive monitoring of treatment response in a rabbit cyanide toxicity model reveals differences in brain and muscle metabolism

Jae G. Kim, Jangwoen Lee, Sari B. Mahon, David Mukai, Steven E. Patterson, Gerry R. Boss, Bruce J. Tromberg, Matthew Brenner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Noninvasive near infrared spectroscopy measurements were performed to monitor cyanide (CN) poisoning and recovery in the brain region and in foreleg muscle simultaneously, and the effects of a novel CN antidote, sulfanegen sodium, on tissue hemoglobin oxygenation changes were compared using a sub-lethal rabbit model. The results demonstrated that the brain region is more susceptible to CN poisoning and slower in endogenous CN detoxification following exposure than peripheral muscles. However, sulfanegen sodium rapidly reversed CN toxicity, with brain region effects reversing more quickly than muscle. In vivo monitoring of multiple organs may provide important clinical information regarding the extent of CN toxicity and subsequent recovery, and facilitate antidote drug development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number105005
JournalJournal of biomedical optics
Volume17
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the AF [9550-04-1-0101, 9550-08-1-0384]; the Laser Microbeam and Medical Program from the National Center for Research Resources [P41RR001192]; the National Institutes of Health [1U54NS063718, U01-NS058030]; Basic research project and APRI-research program through grants provided by GIST, Korea. The authors thank David Yoon for his help in manuscript editing and preparation.

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Cyanide antidote
  • Cyanide poisoning
  • Diffuse optical spectroscopy
  • Metabolism
  • Muscle
  • Sulfanegen sodium

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