Normal CD16 expression and phagocytosis of Mycobacterium avium complex by monocytes from a current cohort of HIV-1-infected patients

Anthony Jaworowski, Philip Ellery, Clare L. Maslin, Eman Naim, Amy Candy Heinlein, Claire E. Ryan, Geza Paukovics, Jane Hocking, Secondo Sonza, Suzanne M. Crowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Monocyte phenotype and function were measured in whole blood sampled from a current cohort of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals attending a large, metropolitan, university-affiliated hospital. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of CD16+ monocytes or the capacity of monocytes to ingest heat-killed Mycobacterium avium complex between these individuals and HIV-uninfected control subjects, regardless of viral load, current CD4+ T cell count, nadir CD4+ T cell count, or time since diagnosis of HIV infection. CD16+ monocyte prevalence was, however, elevated in patients not currently receiving antiretroviral therapy. We conclude that HIV type 1 infection in the setting of highly active antiretroviral therapy is associated with normal monocyte function and phenotype.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)693-697
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume193
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Received 9 May 2005; accepted 6 October 2005; electronically published 31 January 2006. Potential conflicts of interest: none reported. Financial support: National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (grant 281214). C.M. and P.E. are recipients of an NHMRC Dora Lush Postgraduate Research Scholarship, and S.C. is a recipient of an NHMRC Principal Research Fellowship. Reprints or correspondence: Dr. Anthony Jaworowski, Burnet Institute, PO Box 2284, Melbourne, Victoria 3001, Australia (anthonyj@burnet.edu.au).

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