Novel (Multilevel) Focus Group Training for a Transdisciplinary Research Consortium

Jeni Hebert-Beirne, Lisa Kane Low, Kathryn L. Burgio, Cecilia T. Hardacker, Deepa R. Camenga, Aimee S. James, Diane K. Newman, Kyle Rudser, Jesse Nodora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Health researchers are increasingly turning to qualitative research for a nuanced understanding of complex health phenomena. The quality and rigor of qualitative research relies on individual data collector skills, yet few guidelines exist for training multidisciplinary, multi-institution qualitative research teams. Specific guidance is needed on qualitative research practices that ensure scientific rigor by optimizing diverse experience and expertise across research centers. We describe our systematic approach to training a cohort of 15 focus group moderators from seven universities in the Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium’s Study of Habits, Attitudes, Realities, and Experiences (SHARE). SHARE’s aim was to explore women and girls’ experiences, perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and behaviors related to bladder health and function across the life course. Drawing on adult education and action-learning best practices, a three-phase curriculum was designed to maximize moderator proficiency and qualitative research expertise. The phases involved online, interactive web-based education, in-person didactic training with experiential components, and tailored supplemental online training. Evaluative feedback was collected before, during, and after the training. Feedback was used to identify emergent training needs. This training approach may be used by transdisciplinary research teams conducting multisite research to assure qualitative research credibility and trustworthiness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Promotion Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9473-0017 Hebert-Beirne Jeni PhD, MPH 1 Kane Low Lisa PhD, CNM, FACNM, FAAN 2 Burgio Kathryn L. PhD 3 4 Hardacker Cecilia T. MSN, RN, CNL 5 Camenga Deepa R. MD, MHS 6 James Aimee S. PhD, MPH 7 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5083-6397 Newman Diane K. DNP, ANP-BC, FAAN 8 Rudser Kyle PhD 9 Nodora Jesse DrPH 10 1 University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA 2 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA 3 University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA 4 Department of Veterans Affairs, Birmingham, AL, USA 5 Rush University College of Nursing, Chicago, IL, USA 6 Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA 7 Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA 8 University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA 9 University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA 10 University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA Jeni Hebert-Beirne, Associate Professor, School of Public Health, Division of Community Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 West Taylor, Chicago, IL 60612, USA; e-mail: jheber1@uic.edu 10 2019 1524839919875725 © 2019 Society for Public Health Education 2019 Society for Public Health Education Health researchers are increasingly turning to qualitative research for a nuanced understanding of complex health phenomena. The quality and rigor of qualitative research relies on individual data collector skills, yet few guidelines exist for training multidisciplinary, multi-institution qualitative research teams. Specific guidance is needed on qualitative research practices that ensure scientific rigor by optimizing diverse experience and expertise across research centers. We describe our systematic approach to training a cohort of 15 focus group moderators from seven universities in the Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium’s Study of Habits, Attitudes, Realities, and Experiences (SHARE). SHARE’s aim was to explore women and girls’ experiences, perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and behaviors related to bladder health and function across the life course. Drawing on adult education and action-learning best practices, a three-phase curriculum was designed to maximize moderator proficiency and qualitative research expertise. The phases involved online, interactive web-based education, in-person didactic training with experiential components, and tailored supplemental online training. Evaluative feedback was collected before, during, and after the training. Feedback was used to identify emergent training needs. This training approach may be used by transdisciplinary research teams conducting multisite research to assure qualitative research credibility and trustworthiness. women’s health process evaluation program planning and evaluation qualitative research health research health promotion child/adolescent health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases https://doi.org/10.13039/100000062 U01DK106786, U01DK106853, U01DK106858, U01DK106898 national institute of diabetes and digestive and kidney diseases https://doi.org/10.13039/100000062 U01DK106893, U01DK106827, U01DK106908, U01DK106892 edited-state corrected-proof Authors’ Note: The authors would like to acknowledge the following individuals: Loyola University Chicago—multi–principal investigators: Linda Brubaker, MD, MS; Elizabeth Mueller, MD, MSME; Colleen M. Fitzgerald, MD, MS; investigators: Cecilia T. Hardacker, RN, MSN; Jeni M. Hebert-Beirne, PhD, MPH; Missy Lavender, MBA; David A. Shoham, PhD. University of Alabama–Birmingham—principal investigator: Kathryn Burgio, PhD; investigators: Cora Beth Lewis, MD; Alayne Markland, DO, MSc; Gerald McGwin, PhD; Beverly Williams, PhD; University of California–San Diego—principal investigator: Emily S. Lukacz, MD; Investigators: Sheila Gahagan, MD, MPH; D. Yvette LaCoursiere, MD, MPH; Jesse N. Nodora, DrPH. University of Michigan—principal investigator: Janis M. Miller, PhD, MSN; investigators: Lawrence Chin-I An, MD; Lisa Kane Low, PhD, CNM. University of Minnesota—multi–principal investigators: Bernard Harlow, PhD; Kyle Rudser, PhD; investigators: Sonya S. Brady, PhD; John Connett, PhD; Haitao Chu, MD, PhD; Cynthia Fok, MD, MPH; Sarah Lindberg, MPH. University of Pennsylvania—principal investigator: Diane Kaschak Newman, DNP, ANP-BC, FAAN; investigators: Amanda Berry, PhD, CRNP; C. Neill Epperson, MD; Kathryn H. Schmitz, PhD, MPH, FACSM, FTOS; Ariana L. Smith, MD; Ann Stapleton, MD, FIDSA, FACP; Jean Wyman, PhD, RN, FAAN. Washington University in St. Louis—principal investigator: Siobhan Sutcliffe, PhD; investigators: Colleen McNicholas, DO, MSc; Aimee James, PhD, MPH; Jerry Lowder, MD, MSc; Mary Townsend, ScD. Yale University—principal investigator: Leslie Rickey, MD; investigators: Deepa Camenga, MD, MHS; Toby Chai, MD; Jessica B. Lewis, LMFT, MPhil. Steering Committee Chair: Mary H. Palmer, PhD, University of North Carolina. NIH Program Office: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Division of Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases, Bethesda, MD. NIH Project Scientist: Tamara Bavendam MD, MS; Project Officer: Ziya Kirkali, MD; Scientific Advisors: Chris Mullins, PhD and Jenna Norton, MPH. The Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium is supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) through cooperative agreements (grants U01DK106786, U01DK106853, U01DK106858, U01DK106898, U01DK106893, U01DK106827, U01DK106908, U01DK106892). The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health or the Department of Veterans Affairs. ORCID iDs Jeni Hebert-Beirne https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9473-0017 Diane K. Newman https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5083-6397

Keywords

  • child/adolescent health
  • health promotion
  • health research
  • process evaluation
  • program planning and evaluation
  • qualitative research
  • women’s health

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