Obesity, disordered eating, and eating disorders in a longitudinal study of adolescents: How do dieters fare 5 years later?

Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, Melanie Wall, Jia Guo, Mary Story, Jess Haines, Marla Eisenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

530 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine if adolescents who report dieting and different weight-control behaviors are at increased or decreased risk for gains in body mass index, overweight status, binge eating, extreme weight-control behaviors, and eating disorders 5 years later. Design: Population-based 5-year longitudinal study. Participants: Adolescents (N=2,516) from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds who completed Project EAT (Eating Among Teens) surveys in 1999 (Time 1) and 2004 (Time 2). Main outcome measures: Weight status, binge eating, extreme weight control, and self-reported eating disorder. Statistical analysis: Multiple linear and logistic regressions. Results: Adolescents using unhealthful weight-control behaviors at Time 1 increased their body mass index by about 1 unit more than adolescents not using any weight-control behaviors and were at approximately three times greater risk for being overweight at Time 2 (odds ratio [OR]=2.7 for girls; OR=3.2 for boys). Adolescents using unhealthful weight-control behaviors were also at increased risk for binge eating with loss of control (OR=6.4 for girls; OR=5.9 for boys) and for extreme weight-control behaviors such as self-induced vomiting and use of diet pills, laxatives, and diuretics (OR=2.5 for girls; OR=4.8 for boys) 5 years later, compared with adolescents not using any weight-control behaviors. Conclusions: Dieting and unhealthful weight-control behaviors predict outcomes related to obesity and eating disorders 5 years later. A shift away from dieting and drastic weight-control measures toward the long-term implementation of healthful eating and physical activity behaviors is needed to prevent obesity and eating disorders in adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)559-568
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume106
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by grant no. R40 MC 00319 from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (Title V, Social Security Act), Health Resources and Services Administration, US Department of Health and Human Services.

Copyright:
Copyright 2008 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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