Observation of high energy atmospheric neutrinos with the Antarctic muon and neutrino detector array

J. Ahrens, E. Andrés, X. Bai, G. Barouch, S. W. Barwick, R. C. Bay, T. Becka, K. H. Becker, D. Bertrand, F. Binon, A. Biron, J. Booth, O. Botner, A. Bouchta, O. Bouhali, M. M. Boyce, S. Carius, A. Chen, D. Chirkin, J. ConradJ. Cooley, C. G S Costa, D. F. Cowen, E. Dalberg, C. de Clercq, T. de Young, P. Desiati, J. P. Dewulf, P. Doksus, J. Edsjö, P. Ekström, T. Feser, J. M. Frère, T. K. Gaisser, M. Gaug, A. Goldschmidt, A. Hallgren, F. Halzen, K. Hanson, R. Hardtke, T. Hauschildt, M. Hellwig, H. Heukenkamp, G. C. Hill, P. O. Hulth, S. Hundertmark, J. Jacobsen, A. Karle, J. Kim, B. Koci, L. Köpke, M. Kowalski, J. I. Lamoureux, H. Leich, M. Leuthold, P. Lindahl, I. Liubarsky, P. Loaiza, D. M. Lowder, J. Madsen, P. Marciniewski, H. S. Matis, C. P. McParland, T. C. Miller, Y. Minaeva, P. Miočinović, P. C. Mock, R. Morse, T. Neunhöffer, P. Niessen, D. R. Nygren, H. Ögelman, Ph Olbrechts, C. Pérez de los Heros, A. C. Pohl, R. Porrata, P. B. Price, G. T. Przybylski, K. Rawlins, C. Reed, W. Rhode, M. Ribordy, S. Richter, J. Rodríguez Martino, P. Romenesko, D. Ross, H. G. Sander, T. Schmidt, D. Schneider, R. Schwarz, A. Silvestri, M. Solarz, G. M. Spiczak, C. Spiering, N. Starinsky, D. Steele, P. Steffen, R. G. Stokstad, O. Streicher, P. Sudhoff, K. H. Sulanke, I. Taboada, L. Thollander, T. Thon, S. Tilav, M. Vander Donckt, C. Walck, C. Weinheimer, C. H. Wiebusch, C. Wiedeman, R. Wischnewski, H. Wissing, K. Woschnagg, W. Wu, G. Yodh, S. Young

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Abstract

The Antarctic muon and neutrino detector array (AMANDA) began collecting data with ten strings in 1997. Results from the first year of operation are presented. Neutrinos coming through the Earth from the Northern Hemisphere are identified by secondary muons moving upward through the array. Cosmic rays in the atmosphere generate a background of downward moving muons, which are about 106 times more abundant than the upward moving muons. Over 130 days of exposure, we observed a total of about 300 neutrino events. In the same period, a background of 1.05 × 109 cosmic ray muon events was recorded. The observed neutrino flux is consistent with atmospheric neutrino predictions. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that 90% of these events lie in the energy range 66 GeV to 3.4 TeV. The observation of atmospheric neutrinos consistent with expectations establishes AMANDA-B10 as a working neutrino telescope.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number012005
Pages (from-to)120051-1200520
Number of pages1
JournalPhysical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2002

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