On the potential of mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling approaches to the study of biochemical adaptation in psychrophilic yeast

Joseph J. Dalluge, Laurie B. Connell

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4 Scopus citations

Abstract

To move beyond targeted approaches to the biochemical characterization of psychrophilic yeast and provide a more holistic understanding of the chemistry of physiological adaptation of psychrophiles at the molecular level, ultraperformance liquid chromatography combined with simultaneous acquisition of low- and high-collision energy mass spectra (UPLC/MSe) was employed for a preliminary comparative analysis of cell extracts of psychrophilic Antarctic yeasts Cryptococcus vishniacii CBS 10616 and Dioszegia cryoxerica CBS 10919 versus the mesophile Saccharomyces cerevisiae 'cry havoc'. A detailed workflow for providing high-confidence preliminary identifications of psychrophilic yeast-specific molecular features is presented. Preliminary identifications of psychrophile-specific features in C. vishniacii and D. cryoxerica determined with the described method include the glycerophospholipids lysophosphatidylcholine 18:2, lysophosphatidylcholine 18:3, lysophosphatidylethanolamine 18:3, and lysophosphatidylethanolamine 18:2. In addition, levels of guanosine diphosphate appear significantly elevated in cell extracts of the psychrophilic yeasts as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Finally, five psychrophilic yeast-specific peptides have been discovered. All of these are demonstrated to be glycine- and/or proline-rich, a known structural characteristic of many naturally occurring bioactive peptides. The potential of this untargeted metabolite profiling approach as a tool for knowledge discovery and hypothesis generation in the study of biodiversity and microbial adaptation is highlighted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)953-961
Number of pages9
JournalExtremophiles
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgments This work was supported in part by NSF ANT 0739696. The authors wish to acknowledge Katharine Earle and Megan Altenritter for the preparation of quenched cultures of the psychrophilic and mesophilic yeasts studied here.

Keywords

  • Antarctic
  • Arctic
  • Biodiversity
  • Fungi
  • LC/MS
  • Metabolomics
  • Survival

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