Outcome of second bone marrow transplantation following a uniform conditioning regimen as therapy for malignant relapse

K. Y. Chiang, D. J. Weisdorf, S. M. Davies, H. Enright, J. H. Kersey, P. B. McGlave, W. Miller, N. K.C. Ramsay, M. Steinbuch, J. E. Wagner, B. R. Blazar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Twenty-three second bone marrow transplants (BMT) were performed between October 1987 and January 1994 for patients with malignant relapse following initial BMT. For first BMT, twenty-one of 23 (91%) were conditioned with cyclophosphamide plus total body irradiation. For second BMT, a uniform conditioning regimen consisting of busulfan and cyclophosphamide was used. Eleven patients had chronic myelogenous leukemia, seven acute leukemia, four lymphoma, and one myelodysplastic syndrome. Median patient age at second BMT was 32 years, the median time between first BMT and relapse was 22 months, and the median time to second BMT after relapse was 5 months. The second BMT marrow source included: autologous marrow (1), unrelated donors (4), new matched sibling donors (5) and same matched sibling donors as the first BMT (13). The Kaplan-Meier disease-free survival and survival rates at 3 years were 38 and 43%, respectively (median follow-up of survivors was 45 and 48 months, respectively), and five patients survive disease-free at 4-6 years. Nine of the 13 deaths occurred within 100 days after second BMT; eight had relapsed within 1 year of the first BMT. We conclude that: (1) second BMT can offer durable long-term survival in certain patients, especially those who relapse late after first transplant; (2) busulfan and cyclophosphamide is a suitable conditioning regimen for second BMT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-42
Number of pages4
JournalBone marrow transplantation
Volume17
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1996

Keywords

  • Relapse
  • Second BMT

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