Parental involvement in brief interventions for adolescent marijuana use

Timothy F Piehler, Ken C Winters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adolescents (aged 12-18 years) identified in a school setting as abusing marijuana and other drugs were randomly assigned to complete 1 of 2 brief interventions (BIs). Adolescents and their parent (N = 259) were randomly assigned to receive either a 2-session adolescent only (BI-A) or a 2-session adolescent and additional parent session (BI-AP). Interventions were manualized and delivered in a school setting by trained counselors. Adolescents were assessed at intake and at 6 months following the completion of the intervention. Using a latent construct representing 6-month marijuana use outcomes, current findings supported previous research that BI-AP resulted in superior outcomes when compared to BI-A. The presence of a marijuana dependence diagnosis at baseline predicted poorer outcomes when compared to youth without a diagnosis. Both baseline diagnostic status and co-occurring conduct problems interacted with intervention condition in predicting marijuana use outcomes. A marijuana dependence diagnosis resulted in poorer marijuana use outcomes within the BI-A condition when compared to BI-AP. Co-occurring conduct problems were associated with poorer marijuana use outcomes within the BI-AP intervention when compared to BI-A. Implications for implementing BIs given diagnostic status, parent involvement, and co-occurring conduct problems are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)512-521
Number of pages10
JournalPsychology of Addictive Behaviors
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • brief intervention
  • marijuana use
  • parenting interventions

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