Perceived and objective characteristics of the neighborhood environment are associated with accelerometer-measured sedentary time and physical activity, the CARDIA Study

Kara M. Whitaker, Qian Xiao, Kelley Pettee Gabriel, Penny Gordon Larsen, David R. Jacobs, Stephen Sidney, Jared P. Reis, Bethany Barone Gibbs, Barbara Sternfeld, Kiarri Kershaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We investigated cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of neighborhood environment characteristics with accelerometer-measured sedentary time (SED), light-intensity physical activity (LPA), and moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA). Participants were 2120 men and women in the year 20 (2005–2006) and year 30 CARDIA exams (2015–2016). Year 20 neighborhood characteristics included neighborhood cohesion, resources for physical activity, poverty, and racial residential segregation. Physical activity was measured by accelerometer at years 20 and 30. Multivariable linear regression models examined associations of standardized neighborhood measures at year 20 with SED, LPA, and MVPA assessed that year, and with 10-year changes in SED, LPA, and MVPA. Cross-sectionally, a one standard deviation (SD) increase in cohesion was associated with 4.06 less SED min/day (95% CI: −7.98, −0.15), and 4.46 more LPA min/day (95% CI: 0.88, 8.03). Each one SD increase in resources was associated with 1.19 more MVPA min/day (95% CI: 0.06, 2.31). A one SD increase in poverty was associated with 11.18 less SED min/day (95% CI: −21.16, −1.18) and 10.60 more LPA min/day (95% CI: 1.79, 19.41) among black men. No neighborhood characteristic was associated with 10-year changes in physical activity in the full sample; however, a one SD increase in cohesion was associated with a 10-year decrease of 25.44 SED min/day (95% CI: −46.73, −4.14) and an increase of 19.0 LPA min/day (95% CI, 1.89, 36.10) in black men. Characteristics of the neighborhood environment are associated with accelerometer-measured physical activity. Differences were observed by race and sex, with more robust findings observed in black men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-249
Number of pages8
JournalPreventive medicine
Volume123
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA) is conducted and supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) in collaboration with the University of Alabama at Birmingham ( HHSN268201800005I & HHSN268201800007I ), Northwestern University ( HHSN268201800003I ), University of Minnesota ( HHSN268201800006I ), and Kaiser Foundation Research Institute ( HHSN268201800004I ). Accelerometer data collection was supported by grants R01 HL078972 and R56 HL125423 from the NHLBI . This manuscript has been reviewed by CARDIA for scientific content. The authors thank the investigators, the staff, and the participants of the CARDIA study for their valuable contributions.

Keywords

  • Accelerometer
  • Cohesion
  • Neighborhood
  • Physical Activity
  • Poverty
  • Resources
  • Sedentary Time
  • Segregation

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