Perceived Benefits of Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine by Race/Ethnicity Among Midlife and Older Adults in the United States

Pamela Jo Johnson, Judy Jou, Todd H Rockwood, Dawn M. Upchurch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To describe, for a national sample of midlife and older adults, the types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) used for health and wellness and the perceived benefits of CAM use by race/ethnicity. Method: Using data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, we ran multiple logistic regression models to estimate the odds of each perceived benefit among adults ages 50 and older. Results: More than 38% of midlife and older adults used CAM in the past year. For six of seven perceived benefits examined, we found significant differences by race/ethnicity, with each group having higher odds of two or more perceived benefits compared with non-Hispanic Whites. Discussion: Although racial/ethnic minority groups are less likely to use CAM compared with non-Hispanic Whites, those who use CAM perceive great benefit. Future research should examine the potential contribution of evidence-based CAM to promoting health and well-being in a diverse aging population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1376-1397
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of aging and health
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota (P2C HD041023) funded through a grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2018.

Keywords

  • complementary therapies
  • healthy aging
  • midlife
  • race/ethnicity
  • well-being

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