Periprosthetic infection due to resistant staphylococci: Serious problems on the horizon

Javad Parvizi, Khalid Azzam, Elie Ghanem, Matthew S. Austin, Richard H. Rothman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

146 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prosthetic joint infections (PJI) caused by methicillin-resistant staphylococci represent a major therapeutic challenge. We examined the effectiveness of surgical treatment in treating infection of total hip or knee arthroplasty caused by methicillin-resistant staphylococcal strains and the variables influencing treatment success. One hundred and twenty-seven patients were treated at our institution between 1999 and 2006. There were 58 men and 69 women, with an average age of 66 years. Patients were followed for a minimum of 2 years or until recurrence of infection. Débridement and retention of the prosthesis was performed in 35 patients and resection arthroplasty in 92. Débridement controlled the infection in only 37% of cases whereas two-stage exchange arthroplasty controlled the infection in 75% of hips and 60% of knees. Preexisting cardiac disease was associated with a higher likelihood of failure to control infection in all treatment groups. Antibiotic-resistant Staphylococci continue to compromise treatment outcome of prosthetic joint infections, especially in patients with medical comorbidities. New preventive and therapeutic strategies are needed. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1732-1739
Number of pages8
JournalClinical orthopaedics and related research
Volume467
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors did not receive any outside funding or grants in support of their research for or preparation of this work. One or more of the authors (JP, RHR) has received funding from Stryker Orthopaedics (Mahwah, NJ) and Smith & Nephew (Memphis, TN) in support of their research. Each author certifies that his or her institution has approved the human protocol for this investigation and that all investigations were conducted in conformity with ethical principles of research, and that informed consent for participation in the study was obtained.

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