Personal faith and professional ethics: Best practice with the families of sexual and gender minority youths

Sloan Okrey Anderson, Jenifer K. Mcguire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Religious mental health practitioners who hold traditional views of gender and sexuality may face moral and ethical dilemmas when working with sexual and gender minority (SGM) clients. Typical responses to this dilemma include selective positioning, values-based referrals, and attempted objectivity. Grounded in social work ethics and values, this article examines the evidence base, viability, and repercussions of these approaches. This article demonstrates the importance of cultural competence and affirmative therapeutic practices for religious mental health practitioners, whether or not they expect to work with gender and sexual minority clients or their families. In addition, the author tackles the difficult issue of providing ethical, evidence-based therapeutic services for religiously conservative parents of SGM children and adolescents. SGM people exist in every community, in every faith, and in every kind of family. The ethical treatment of SGM clients is relevant to all mental health practitioners, regardless of personal values or the type of practice they maintain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-372
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Work (United States)
Volume64
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 31 2019

Keywords

  • Bisexual
  • Gay
  • Lesbian
  • Practice ethics
  • Religion
  • Religiosity
  • Sexual and gender minorities
  • Transgender issues

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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