Phenomenological research among Canadian and United States indigenous populations: Oral tradition and quintessence of time

Roxanne Struthers, Cynthia J Peden-McAlpine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Researchers conducting phenomenological studies among indigenous peoples in the United States and Canada have identified a seamless link between phenomenology and indigenous oral tradition. Phenomenology is compatible with indigenous peoples, because it is synchronous with holistic indigenous cultural lifeway and values. Phenomenology, as a research method, assists indigenous people in reproducing, through narrative communication, features of the past, present, and future. In the narrative process, this method elicits significant implicit meaning of indigenous culture and assists with recording the essence of experiences and events of indigenous societies. A product of the telling of narrative stories is the capacity to reflect on change that will enhance health in a holistic and culturally acceptable manner.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1264-1276
Number of pages13
JournalQualitative Health Research
Volume15
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005

Bibliographical note

Copyright:
Copyright 2008 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Aboriginal
  • American Indian
  • First Nations
  • Indigenous
  • Interpretive research
  • Narratives
  • Oral tradition
  • Time

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